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7 Ways to Keep Your Dog Safe During The Hot Months And Summer Heat





Summer is in full swing! But the things that make summertime so wonderful can also make it so dangerous for your pup. The hot weather and sunshine, though they feel great, can cause overheating or heatstroke in your dog. Summer should be the time to enjoy the outdoors together, so here are some ways to keep your pup safe and beat the heat:

1. Stay Hydrated

The warmer weather means your dog is going to be more thirsty than normal. Always have access to clean and, preferably, cool water. For example, you can keep water bottles on hand when out and about and bring along pop-up water bowls. If you're driving somewhere, you can also keep a cooler with ice and water. 

2. Sit In the Shade 

When enjoying the outdoors with your pup in the heat, it's best to find some shade and spend the majority of your time out of the sun. If you can't find any shade, bring along a tarp or blanket to create your own shady spot.

Pro Tip: Doghouses can actually get hotter than the outside temperature because there's no air flow, so it's usually best to avoid putting your dog there in the heat.

3. Check The Concrete

Always check the temperature of the ground outside before letting your pup walk on it. Pavement, asphalt and concrete can become hotter than the air, which can burn or damage your dog's paws. To check the temperature, place the back of your hand on the ground for at least 10 seconds - if it's too hot for you, it's too hot for your dog. 

4. Avoid Peak Heat Hours

Sometimes it's difficult to avoid the heat during the spring and summer because, well, it's always warm. To enjoy time outside while being safe when this is the case, avoid the hottest hours of the day. In general, the peak heat hours are noon to 3:00pm, when the sun is highest in the sky and more heat is accumulating on earth than leaving it.

5. Groom For The Season

Another way to beat the heat, which applies to some (but not all) dogs, is grooming. Getting your dog's fur cut nice and short can help cool them down during spring and summer. But this is only an option for certain breeds, so it's best to consult a vet or research if your dog could benefit from a summer cut.

Pro Tip: Some breeds need their coat to protect them from the sun and cutting it short could cause them to get sunburned. In addition, a healthy coat can help keep dogs cool by regulating their body temperature.

6. No Alone Time In Cars

This is a pretty well-known thing, but important to repeat: never leave your dog alone in a hot car. Cars can quickly reach dangerous levels of heat, easily becoming 20 degrees warmer than temperatures outside. And leaving the windows open isn't enough to cool the car down to safe temperatures. If you have tasks at places that don't allow dogs, it's best to keep your pup at home or take him to daycare.

7. Be Knowledgeable

It's aways a good idea to be prepared, just in case, and knowing the signs of heatstroke can save lives. If you see your dog excessively panting without resolution, it can indicate heatstroke. Other signs include dark red or purple tongue, difficulty breathing, glazed eyes, rapid heartbeat and vomiting.

Pro Tip: Brachycephalic breeds (those with short muzzles), overweight dogs, dogs with thick or heavy fur, and older dogs are more prone to heatstroke. 



7 Ways to Keep Your Dog Safe During The Hot Months And Summer Heat





Summer is in full swing! But the things that make summertime so wonderful can also make it so dangerous for your pup. The hot weather and sunshine, though they feel great, can cause overheating or heatstroke in your dog. Summer should be the time to enjoy the outdoors together, so here are some ways to keep your pup safe and beat the heat:

1. Stay Hydrated

The warmer weather means your dog is going to be more thirsty than normal. Always have access to clean and, preferably, cool water. For example, you can keep water bottles on hand when out and about and bring along pop-up water bowls. If you're driving somewhere, you can also keep a cooler with ice and water. 

2. Sit In the Shade 

When enjoying the outdoors with your pup in the heat, it's best to find some shade and spend the majority of your time out of the sun. If you can't find any shade, bring along a tarp or blanket to create your own shady spot.

Pro Tip: Doghouses can actually get hotter than the outside temperature because there's no air flow, so it's usually best to avoid putting your dog there in the heat.

3. Check The Concrete

Always check the temperature of the ground outside before letting your pup walk on it. Pavement, asphalt and concrete can become hotter than the air, which can burn or damage your dog's paws. To check the temperature, place the back of your hand on the ground for at least 10 seconds - if it's too hot for you, it's too hot for your dog. 

4. Avoid Peak Heat Hours

Sometimes it's difficult to avoid the heat during the spring and summer because, well, it's always warm. To enjoy time outside while being safe when this is the case, avoid the hottest hours of the day. In general, the peak heat hours are noon to 3:00pm, when the sun is highest in the sky and more heat is accumulating on earth than leaving it.

5. Groom For The Season

Another way to beat the heat, which applies to some (but not all) dogs, is grooming. Getting your dog's fur cut nice and short can help cool them down during spring and summer. But this is only an option for certain breeds, so it's best to consult a vet or research if your dog could benefit from a summer cut.

Pro Tip: Some breeds need their coat to protect them from the sun and cutting it short could cause them to get sunburned. In addition, a healthy coat can help keep dogs cool by regulating their body temperature.

6. No Alone Time In Cars

This is a pretty well-known thing, but important to repeat: never leave your dog alone in a hot car. Cars can quickly reach dangerous levels of heat, easily becoming 20 degrees warmer than temperatures outside. And leaving the windows open isn't enough to cool the car down to safe temperatures. If you have tasks at places that don't allow dogs, it's best to keep your pup at home or take him to daycare.

7. Be Knowledgeable

It's aways a good idea to be prepared, just in case, and knowing the signs of heatstroke can save lives. If you see your dog excessively panting without resolution, it can indicate heatstroke. Other signs include dark red or purple tongue, difficulty breathing, glazed eyes, rapid heartbeat and vomiting.

Pro Tip: Brachycephalic breeds (those with short muzzles), overweight dogs, dogs with thick or heavy fur, and older dogs are more prone to heatstroke. 




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